Overview

Suspended ceilings are secondary ceilings suspended from the structural floor slab above, creating a void between the underside of the floor slab and the top of the suspended ceiling. The gap between a suspended ceiling and the structural floor slab above is often between 3 to 8 inches which is why they are often referred to as dropped ceilings or false ceilings. 

Suspended ceilings are very popular in commercial properties as they provide a useful space for concealing unsightly wires and installations that otherwise would alter the interior appearance of the building. 

The space gained through installed a suspended ceiling has proved useful for distribution of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) services and plumbing and wiring services, as well as providing a platform for the installation of speakers, light fittings, wireless antenna, CCTV, fire and smoke detectors, motion detectors, sprinklers and so on.

The major classification based on materials used are listed briefly below

  • Gypsum Ceiling
  • Plaster of Paris Ceiling
  • Fiber Ceiling
  • Wooden Ceiling
  • Glass Ceiling
  • Metal Ceiling
  • Synthetic Leather or Cloth Ceiling

Benefits

Suspended ceilings can be differentiated into many types based on their uses, material used and appearance and visibility.